Me taking measurements of accumulated snow above an IceTop tank.
Me taking measurements of accumulated snow above an IceTop tank.

Today I went out again with Sam, and also with Elisa who joined us for our afternoon outing. We had set ourselves an ambitious goal: to measure snow accumulation totals at all 162 IceTop tanks across an area of one square kilometer! We actually did about 154 out of 162, and we took all measurements in about three and a half hours, something that I still cannot believe myself. This number translates into 77 different locations that we drove to, as tanks were constructed in pairs.

Since it is thought that snow accumulation above IceTop's tanks can affect cosmic ray measurements with this experiment, the IceCube team is wanting to investigate this topic. But I will let the pictures speak for themselves. I am also posting a description of IceTop and of this season's research, written by Elisa, that will help clarify what are we doing here at the South Pole with IceTop.

Sam driving the snowmobile.  We drove to 38 different tank locations!
Sam driving the snowmobile. We drove to 38 different tank locations!

Me taking measurements, with Elisa writing down the numbers from within the vehicle.
Me taking measurements, with Elisa writing down the numbers from within the vehicle.

Boots sinking into the snow.
Boots sinking into the snow.

More measurements, with the IceCube Laboratory (ICL) in the background.
More measurements, with the IceCube Laboratory (ICL) in the background.

Back after three and a half hours.  Me plugging in the snowmobile's engine block heater.
Back after three and a half hours. Me plugging in the snowmobile's engine block heater.

Elisa has kindly provided the following explanation concerning the work that is being done with IceTop:

Our project for the current summer season at the South Pole concerns studying the effects of snow accumulation on top of IceTop tanks, on the charge spectrum of cosmic ray particles.

IceTop is an array that uses the same physics principle of IceCube and the same hardware, but instead of being buried deep in the ice, IceTop detectors are deployed at the surface and aim to study mainly cosmic rays, more so than neutrinos. Snow is naturally blown up by winds in the Antarctic Plateau, which brings accumulation on top of IceTop tanks. One of the effects of snow accumulation has been already noticed by the IceTop collaboration: the electromagnetic component of the charge spectrum of cosmic ray particles has been significantly weakened in those tanks which have accumulated the greatest amount of snow. It is yet to be determined whether the muonic part of the charge spectrum is affected as well or not. So the main goal is to identify and understand all possible effects of snow accumulations over the tanks.

In order to achieve this we are using the so called 'muon taggers'. Muon taggers are simple, visible light detectors based on the scintillation principle. Two plastic scintillators have been coupled with photomultipliers (PMTs) and are later enclosed in wooden boxes to prevent interaction with external light. If a charged particle interacts with both the surface (IceTop) and the underground detector (IceCube) producing scintillation light at the same time, a coincident event happened. This charged particle is called a muon. Indeed, at this elevation above sea level (about 3,000 meters) cosmic ray particles impinging on the surface are mainly muons and electrons. Only muons possess an energy content high enough to interact with both scintillators. On the other hand, as electrons do not carry enough energy nor interact easily with matter, they will not be able to produce the same effect as muons do.

These coincident events are always recorded and get a time stamp from a GPS antenna. Further analysis will focus on comparing IceCube events with IceTop ones to see if the same event that lit both scintillators could indeed have enough energy to interact with the IceTop tank as well. By doing this, we have just tagged a muon!

We are currently using two types of muon taggers: small (with red boxes) and big (with flashy colorful boxes). These boxes are held by a wooden structure to keep the proper alignment, either vertical or with an inclination to the horizon, during the entire length of the data collection period. Data acquisition modules (DAQs) for these detectors are kept in heavy-duty plastic suitcases which are lined with a thick insulating layer to prevent them from getting too cold. These DAQs include a GPS antenna to do the time stamps, a high voltage battery for the PMTs, and an USB drive to store the data and provide a booting sequence for the electronics inside the DAQs.

Field work has consisted so far in deploying these detectors at the surface, on top of IceTop tanks, which is usually done in the morning. After connecting all cables and providing adequate power, data acquisition starts. Standard data runs last eight hours, so usually by the end of the day we will have retrieved all the DAQ suitcases and carried them inside the IceCube Laboratory (ICL) to allow warming up overnight. Afterwards, these timestamps will be used to grab the signals left by these particles in the IceTop tanks.

Cross-sectional view of an IceTop Tank.  Credit: The IceCube Collaboration.
Cross-sectional view of an IceTop Tank. Credit: The IceCube Collaboration.

Photograph of a frozen IceTop tank ready to be closed.  Credit: The IceCube Collaboration.
Photograph of a frozen IceTop tank ready to be closed. Credit: The IceCube Collaboration.

Aquí aparezco realizando mediciones de acumulación de nieve sobre un tanque de IceTop.
Aquí aparezco realizando mediciones de acumulación de nieve sobre un tanque de IceTop.

Hoy durante la tarde nuevamente salí afuera con Sam, y también con Elisa que se nos unió. La meta era ambiciosa: realizar mediciones de acumulación de nieve en cada uno de los 162 tanques del IceTop, los cuales están distribuidos sobre un área de un kilómetro cuadrado. En realidad hicimos 154 de 162, pero lo asombroso y que aún no me creo es que hayamos podido completar esta tarea en apenas tres horas y media. Estas cifras corresponden a 77 puntos distintos entre los cuales nos tuvimos que mover, debido a que los tanques de IceTop no están solos sino en pares.

Se piensa que la acumulación de nieve sobre los tanques del IceTop puede afectar las mediciones de rayos cósmicos realizadas por el instrumento. Esto ha motivado al personal científico de IceCube a investigar el asunto. Pero bien, les dejaré las fotografías que hablan por sí solas. También presento en el post de hoy una descripción, redactada por Elisa, del instrumento IceTop y de los trabajos de investigación que se están realizando durante esta temporada con el mencionado instrumento.

Sam manejando el motonieve.  ¡Nos movimos entre 38 puntos distintos!
Sam manejando el motonieve. ¡Nos movimos entre 38 puntos distintos!

Aquí aparezco tomando medidas, mientras que Elisa apuntaba los números desde dentro del vehículo.
Aquí aparezco tomando medidas, mientras que Elisa apuntaba los números desde dentro del vehículo.

Las botas se hundían en la nieve.
Las botas se hundían en la nieve.

Continúan las medidas, en esta ocasión con el laboratorio IceCube (ICL) en el fondo.
Continúan las medidas, en esta ocasión con el laboratorio IceCube (ICL) en el fondo.

De vuelta luego de tres horas y media.  Aquí aparezco conectando el calefactor de motor.
De vuelta luego de tres horas y media. Aquí aparezco conectando el calefactor de motor.

Elisa ha tenido la amabilidad de proveer la siguiente explicación sobre el trabajo que se está realizando con el IceTop:

El proyecto que tenemos para esta temporada de trabajo aquí en el polo sur consiste en averiguar el efecto que pudiera tener, sobre el espectro de carga de los rayos cósmicos recibidos en superficie, la acumulación de nieve sobre los tanques cilíndricos del IceTop.

El IceTop como instrumento se rige por los mismos principios físicos que gobiernan el IceCube, e igualmente utiliza los mismos equipos. La diferencia medular radica que los detectores del IceTop están colocados en la superficie, y además que pretenden estudiar principalmente los rayos cósmicos y no tanto los neutrinos. Los vientos del altiplano antártico levantan continuamente la nieve y la depositan luego sobre toda la superficie, acumulándose especialmente sobre los tanques del IceTop. Esto acarrea unos efectos que ya han sido comprobados, por ejemplo, la casi supresión del componente electromagnético en el espectro de carga de los rayos cósmicos, dentro de aquellos tanques del IceTop donde ha habido una acumulación significativa de nieve. Queda aún pendiente por determinar si el componente muónico del espectro de carga se vería tambien afectado. La meta principal, por tanto, sería averiguar los efectos que la nieve pudiera tener al acumularse sobre los tanques.

Pretendemos lograr lo anterior empleando 'medidores de muones'. Un medidor de muones no es otra cosa sino un detector de luz visible optimizado para captar el centelleo. Hemos colocado, dentro de un cajón de madera, dos sensores plásticos de centelleo conjuntamente con dispositivos fotomultiplicadores (PMTs). El cajón los aisla de la luz exterior. Cuando una partícula cargada interactúa tanto sobre el detector de superficie como sobre el detector subterráneo, produciéndose una luz centelleante a ambos lados, podemos decir que ha ocurrido un evento de coincidencia. Dicha partícula cargada será un muón. Precisamente, son los muones y los electromes los principales componentes de los rayos cósmicos que alcanzan el terreno, a estas alturas sobre el nivel del mar (unos 3,000 metros). Pero sólo los muones poseen un contenido energético suficiente como para ser captado por ambos detectores. Como los electrones no llevan energía suficiente y apenas interactún con la materia, nos serán captados como los muones.

Estos efectos de coincidencia siempre se registran, y se les pone fecha y hora directamente desde un aparato de GPS. Más adelante y según progrese la investigación se compararán los eventos registrados por el IceCube con los del IceTop, para ver si un mismo evento captado por ambos detectores pudiera tener la energía suficiente para interactuar con el IceTop. Una vez esto suceda, podríamos decir que hemos medido un muón.

Al presente estamos utilizando dos clases de medidores de muones: los pequeños (que están alojados en un cajón rojo) y los grandes (con cajones de colores). Estos cajones descansan sobre una base de madera para así mantener la alineación requerida con el horizonte, y así permanecen todo el tiempo que dure la recolección de datos. Estos medidores están conectados a unos módulos para la adquisición de datos (DAQ), los cuales residen en unos maletines muy resistentes, y que a su vez han sido forrados por dentro, para evitar que se enfríen demasiado. Estos DAQ tienen conectividad a GPS para obtener fecha y hora, además de baterías para los fotomultiplicadores y una unidad USB que provee tanto espacio de almacenaje como la secuencia de arranque para los DAQ.

Hasta el momento, el trabajo de campo ha consistido en instalar estos detectores en la superficie y directamente encima de los tanques del IceTop, trabajo que usualmente se realiza durante la mañana. La recolección de los datos empieza enseguida que estén conectados todos los cables y que igualmente haya una fuente de energía. Los periodos de recolección se extienden normalmente durante ocho horas, lo cual significa que al final del día habremos recuperado todos los DAQ con sus maletines y los habremos llevado de vuelta al laboratorio IceCube (ICL) donde permanecerán a temperatura corriente durante la noche. Posteriormente se utilizarán las fechas y horas para identificar las señales dejadas por las partículas dentro de los tanques del IceTop.

Esquema de los tanques del IceTop.  Crédito: The IceCube Collaboration.
Esquema de los tanques del IceTop. Crédito: The IceCube Collaboration.

Fotografía de un tanque del IceCube al momento de ser cerrado.  Crédito: The IceCube Collaboration.
Fotografía de un tanque del IceCube al momento de ser cerrado. Crédito: The IceCube Collaboration.

Date
Weather Summary
Cloudy for the fifth day in a row.
Temperature
–27 °C (–17 °F)
Wind Speed
12 km/hr (7 miles per hour)
Wind Chill
–37 °C (–34 °F)
Add Comment

Comments

Lymari Hernandez (not verified)

Ya el martes comienza Ecosteam y los estudiantes están muy motivados por tu regreso. ..Kiany me pidió imprimir el libro que le pasaste para que le des el autógrafo y se lo dediques...ahora te ven diferente...es emocionante! !!.Cada mañana le envío las fotos diarias a Miguel para ser publicadas en la página de Facebook de la escuela. ..y hoy me pregunto si sacaste licencia para manejar en el Polo Sur...al verte en la moto nieve. .y mil cosas más que te diré en persona. ..es un charlatan. ..tu sabes que a él le gusta bromear...cuídate. .y hasta pronto. ..un abrazo

Anne Verbruggen (not verified)

Armando, it is really increadible you spent 3 and 1/2 hours in that cold working, measuring and writing! Pretty hard job! Congratulations to you and the team from Belgium!

Armando Caussade

Magnífico todo lo que me cuentas. Dile a los estudiantes que agradezco muchísimo el interés que han tenido por este proyecto. Y a Kiany que tan pronto yo regrese tendrá mi autógrafo. Con Miguel también nos reiremos un rato cuando regrese y tengamos oportunidad de compartir las fotografías, que son muchas (lo que presento aquí apenas es una muestra). Y a ti en particular te agradezco que estés proveyendo las fotografías para Facebook. Regresaré a la escuela y a EcoSTEAM el lunes, 26 de enero y celebraremos. ¡Hasta pronto!

Armando Caussade

Yes, I could not believe it myself. But the temperatures were relatively mild that day, and even Sam commented on that. Somehow cloudy days at the pole are warmer, and when it gets clear and sunny temperatures drop. Thanks for following this journal and for your good wishes.