Resource Type
Informal Education Product
Region
Antarctic
Completion Time
Less than 1 period
Grade
All Aged
Permission
Download and Share
Author(s)
Jocelyn Argueta
Related Members

Tiny Ice: Bits From Antarctica (a YouTube Series)

Overview

PolarTREC informal educator Jocelyn Argueta traveled to the South Pole in 2019 with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory and Askaryan Radio Array Expedition. She created a YouTube series Tiny Ice: Bits from Antarctica to highlight the travel, science, and life at the South Pole, both in English and Spanish. In this 10-part series, each topic is explained in 2-minute, digestible segments which include photos and videos from her trip, as well as anecdotes to help viewers get a personal perspective of Antarctica. The videos are also supplemented with additional information shared on her social media platforms: Facebook and Instagram.

Objectives

The video series presents different aspects of Antarctica:

  1. Introduction (Logistics) of the Expedition
  2. U.S. Research Stations in Antarctica
  3. Extreme Cold Weather Gear
  4. Wildlife
  5. History of Antarctica
  6. Multiple South Poles
  7. Life and work at the South Pole
  8. IceCube Laboratory
  9. SPICE Core: South Pole Ice
  10. Doing science at the South Pole

Additionally, the series invites the audience to access different PolarTREC resources cited in the captions and to submit questions on Facebook and Instagram. The goal is to recreate an outreach presentation online, and have the information accessible at any time.

Preparation/Resource Access

This product is available at any time on YouTube. The viewing audience must be able to access YouTube and have reliable internet connection. Although the live interaction on Facebook and Instagram will only take place during August-September 2020, ongoing submission is still encouraged through video comments or emails.

Video Series

  • Tiny Ice Promo Video (English):
  • Episode 1: But Whyyyyyy? :
  • Episode 2: U.S. Research Stations:
  • Episode 3: Extreme Cold Weather Gear:
  • Episode 4: Are there penguins at the South Pole?:
  • Episode 5: Who Owns Antarctica?!:
  • Episode 6: South Pole(s)?
  • Episode 7: Life at the South Pole
  • Episode 8: IceCube Neutrino Observatory
  • Episode 9: South Pole Ice Core Camp
  • Episode 10: Why Science at the South Pole? .be

Transferability

Any video in this series would be great to open a lesson on Antarctica, extreme environmental conditions, or the application of physics and engineering degrees. They are a great resource for educators to use to bring visuals and anecdotes to polar science.

These videos can be used in class to supplement existing curriculum or in after school, at-home, remote, or informal learning environments.

Resources

You can follow-up video viewing with reading Jocelyn's PolarTREC expedition journals here:
IceCube and The Askaryan Radio Array 2019 Expedition page

Assessment

Basic assessment for each episode is available in the PDF document attached.

Institution Involvement:

“Jargie the Science Girl!” is a live, nationally-touring show for kids created and hosted by Jocelyn Argueta. The show, which is designed for grades K-5, began touring Southern California schools in 2017 with Phantom Projects Theatre Group and has since reached thousands of students across the U.S. The national theatre version premiered at the Smithsonian Institute’s Discovery Theatre in 2019. Argueta continues to create educational content (especially about Antarctica!) online for all ages through her YouTube channel “TheScienceJ".

Author/Credits

The video series was created by
Jocelyn Argueta, PolarTREC educator 2019
Jargie the Science Girl
Los Angeles, CA
thesciencej [at] gmail.com

Standards Other

NGSS Alignment:

The video series is meant to introduce the viewer to different aspects of Antarctica throughout the series. Topics and standards include:

Video 2: US Research Stations in Antarctica

  • K-PS3-1 Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.
  • 3-ESS2-2 Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.
  • MS-ESS2-6 Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

Video 3: Extreme Cold Weather Gear

  • 3-ESS2-2: Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.
  • MS-ETS1-1: Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

Video 4: Wildlife

  • 3-LS4-3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less, and some cannot survive at all.

Video 5: History of Antarctica

  • HS-LS2-7: Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
  • MS-ESS3-3: Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Video 6: Multiple South Poles

  • 4-ESS2-2: Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.

Video 7: Life and Work at the South Pole

  • 3-5-ETS1-2: Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  • HS-ETS1-2: Design a solution to a complex problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
  • HS-ETS1-3: Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.

Video 8: IceCube Laboratory

  • HS-ETS1-3 Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.
  • HS-ESS1-3: Communicate scientific ideas about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements

Video 9: SPICE Core - Understanding the South Pole Ice

  • MS-PS4-2: Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
  • HS-PS4-5: Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.

Video 10: Doing Science at the South Pole

  • HS-ETS1-2: Design a solution to a complex problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

Polar Literacy Principles

Again, these topics can be found throughout the video series and are applicable to the following principles:

** Video 2: U.S. Research Stations in Antarctica**

  • Polar Literacy Principle 1A-4: Ice sheets on Antarctica average ~2-4 kilometers thick.
  • Polar Literacy Principle 1B: Earth’s tilted axis affects polar seasons.

Video 4: Wildlife

  • Polar Literacy Principle 1D-2: In the Antarctic, terrestrial life is not widespread and is generally limited to the continental margin and the ocean. Vegetation is limited to mosses, liverworts, lichens and fungi that can survive extreme environments. There are no native human populations in Antarctica.
  • Polar Literacy Principle 4C-1: Antarctica is home to marine mammals (whales and seals) and sea birds, including penguins. Antarctica is not home to terrestrial mammals.

Video 8: IceCube Laboratory

  • Polar Literacy Principle 7D: Antarctica’s high elevation and dry atmosphere allow measurements of cosmic microwave background (fossil light from the early universe).

Video 9: SPICE Core - Understanding the South Pole Ice

  • Polar Literacy Principle 2A-1: Land ice includes glaciers and ice sheets made from compacted snow (freshwater). Glaciers and ice sheets can extend over the ocean. Ice sheets that extend over the ocean are called ice shelves.

Video 10: Doing Science at the South Pole

  • Polar Literacy Principle 7D: Antarctica’s high elevation and dry atmosphere allow measurements of cosmic microwave background (fossil light from the early universe).
Attachment Size
Download Tiny Ice Assessment [DOCX]12.56 KB 12.56 KB
Download Tiny Ice Assessment [PDF]75.07 KB 75.07 KB