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We planned a relatively short day in the field today (~4-5 hours) to do some trawling and sediment grabs in the adjacent waters. The whole house sprang into action, as those departing in the boat prepared to do so, those remaining took on projects that could be completed in the bunkhouse.  Carrie Harris separates one DNA sample into two.Carrie Harris separates one DNA sample into two using sterile technique.  Tara makes ice to help transport all of the samples.Tara makes ice to help transport all of the samples to Texas and other locations. As we move away from the shore, Kaktovik can be seen.As we move away from the shore, Kaktovik can be seen in the distance behind the protective snow fence. Dr. Ken Dunton dares to take a bite of the mud : )Dr. Ken Dunton dares to take a bite of the mud : ) This larger mud sample will be tested.This larger mud sample will be tested for sediment porewater nutrients. Stephanie is so tough so uses duct tape for a bandaid!Stephanie is so tough so uses duct tape for a bandaid! Stephanie and I begin the process of sorting through the mud.Stephanie and I begin the process of sorting through the mud for benthic organisms. We use a screen to wash away the mud and keep the organisms.We use a screen to wash away the mud and keep the organisms. Stephanie and Dr. Ken begin to wash through the first trawl sample.Stephanie and Dr. Ken begin to wash through the first trawl sample. She washes through the screen and he washes out the trawl net.She washes through the screen and he washes out the trawl net. That apple doesn't stand a chance! That apple doesn't stand a chance! And, something is escaping from the wheelhouse! The escapee was Ted Dunton!The escapee was Ted Dunton! The Sonde is an expensive, high tech piece of equipment that measures many water quality parameters. We took data on temperature, conductivity, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH and chlorophyll at three different depths. We measured at the surface, at two meters and at three meters which is just above the bottom of the water column. Stephanie and Dr. Ken prepare to deploy the Sonde.Stephanie and Dr. Ken prepare to deploy the Sonde. It turned out to be a beautiful day on the Beaufort Sea!It turned out to be a beautiful day on the Beaufort Sea! Dragging the trawl allows those on board (not captaining!) to sneak in a quick cat nap. The trawl is usually in the water for at least 10 minutes up to 20 or so. Nap time! I had finished my short nap just before these photos were taken. Nap time for Dr. Dunton.Nap time for Dr. Dunton. Nap time for Stephanie.Nap time for Stephanie. I help to bring in the trawl net.I help to bring in the trawl net. Steph and I sort through the organisms brought up in the trawl.Steph and I sort through the organisms brought up in the trawl. Kaktovik as seen from the east.  There is no snow fence on this side.Kaktovik as seen from the east. There is no snow fence on this side. The bunkhouse can be seen right in the middle of this photo!The bunkhouse can be seen right in the middle of this photo! Two Arctic flounder and a Lumpenus fabricii.Two Arctic flounder and a Lumpenus fabricii. Same group with shells and terrestrial organic matter!Same group with shells and terrestrial organic matter!