journal tabs

Journal
Armando Caussade's picture

I got up today at 5:15 am with great excitement, knowing that in a few hours I would be boarding my flight for Antarctica. Here is a summary of this exciting day.

Headed to Antarctica!Headed to Antarctica!

The day before we had left USAP at around 4:00 pm, and later on went for dinner in Christchurch. I went to bed at about 10:00 pm and woke up feeling well rested and refreshed. I picked up my luggage—which I had already packed the night before—and checked out of Pavillions Hotel. A bus came at exactly 6:00 am to pick us up, as we had been instructed to report to the USAP offices at 6:30 am. There were about eight people in the bus, including three IceCubers: James, Hans and I.

5:56 am: Boarding the bus that took us to the USAP offices in Christchurch, New Zealand.5:56 am: Boarding the bus that took us to the USAP offices in Christchurch, New Zealand.

A few minutes later we arrived at the facility. We picked up the extreme cold weather (ECW) gear that was handed down to us on Monday and put it in. This is standard procedure when flying to, from or throughout Antarctica. No one is allowed to board or unboard the airplane unless wearing the red USAP parka, boots, plus four other key items. There were multiple posters on the walls detailing all procedures and explaining everything to us.

6:44 am: Getting ready with my ECW extreme cold weather (ECW) gear.6:44 am: Getting ready with my ECW extreme cold weather (ECW) gear.

At 7:20 am we went in for a briefing explaining all aspects of travel to Antarctica that USAP participants and grantees need to know. Travel logistics were again explained to us, as well as security and safety precautions. There are also strict ecological guidelines to abide to while visiting Antarctica. At 8:00 pm we took yet another bus that took us to the airfield and started boarding. Engines were started and we took to the air at exactly 9:25 am. Flight time to McMurdo Station would be exactly eight hours, just as we had been told.

8:25 am: Boarding the plane to Antarctica!8:25 am: Boarding the plane to Antarctica!

This flight was different, as we traveled in a ski-equipped cargo airplane. Thirty-six people were in the plane: 32 passengers and 4 crew. There were among us a number of participants of the Antarctica New Zealand program, who were headed for Scott Base, which is located in Ross island just steps away from McMurdo Station. Once inside the airplane we were allowed to shed part of our gear, on condition that it remained in hand for use immediately after landing.

9:37 am: Flying down to Antarctica!9:37 am: Flying down to Antarctica!

Cargo aircraft such as the one we flew in do not really have passenger cabin windows, like regular commercial airplanes. But there are usually two or three small windows on each side, and I was fortunate to sit exactly by one of those. I watched out and started seeing drift ice in the ocean like halfway during the trip, which would translate into a latitude of approximately 60 degrees south. Later on—from about three quarters of the way, onwards, latitude 70 and beyond—I saw large packs of ice.

2:24 pm: The view from the airplane window, around latitude 64 degrees south.2:24 pm: The view from the airplane window, around latitude 64 degrees south.

4:14 pm: The view further on, around latitude 73 degrees south.4:14 pm: The view further on, around latitude 73 degrees south.

The airplane landed in the Ross Ice Shelf about 12 kilometers from McMurdo Station, at 5:25 pm. There are at present three runways serving McMurdo, and I am almost certain that the one that we used was Williams Field. The actual landing of our ski-equipped airplane felt softer than that of commercial airplanes, and the aircraft glided over the ice for a few kilometers before finally stopping down. The gliding was absolutely graceful. Although fast, it was extremely smooth and stable.

5:25 pm: Arrival at the McMurdo airfield, 12 kilometers away from the main station.5:25 pm: Arrival at the McMurdo airfield, 12 kilometers away from the main station.

Ross Ice Shelf is a large piece of ice floating atop the ocean, but the section we landed in is next to Ross island, which itself is very near the coast of Antarctica proper. And I can say that landing in the ice shelf was quite an experience! Ice is everywhere, and the ground looks completely bleached. Then, it was partly cloudy, so the sky also looked whitish. I felt that it was a beautiful, impressive sight, but the view may be overwhelming for the unprepared.

5:26 pm: This is how it looked like around the airfield.  Latitude is almost 78 degrees south.5:26 pm: This is how it looked like around the airfield. Latitude is almost 78 degrees south.

A USAP bus was already there waiting for us. We went up a hill on an unpaved—but very well kept—road built over dark, volcanic gravel. As we were told, safety is paramount in Antarctica and vehicles must observe strict speed limits. The ride to the station proper took like half an hour, which included a stop near New Zealand's Scott Base to leave some eight passengers. Around 6:00 pm we officially arrived at McMurdo Station and were welcomed by the station manager for a 30-minute briefing.

6:11 pm: Arrival at the McMurdo Station.6:11 pm: Arrival at the McMurdo Station.

Around 8:30 pm I went out with Hans and two other people, walking through town and taking a number of pictures along the way. Time went past like a snap of the fingers, and before we knew it was already eleven in the evening. The Sun is up all the time, so one simply does not notice how late it gets. I was out wearing my sunglasses, which is vital in Antarctica, as the ozone hole in the atmosphere opens up just above the continent and dangerous levels of ultraviolet light from the Sun reach ground level. But then, I realized that I did not recall ever wearing sunglasses at 11 pm!

11:11 pm: Wearing sunglasses at eleven in the evening!11:11 pm: Wearing sunglasses at eleven in the evening!

Translation

Hoy me he levantado a las 5:15 am con gran entusiasmo, ya que en apenas unas horas me tocaría abordar mi vuelo con destino a la Antártida. A continuación les resumo las incidencias de este extraordinario día.

¡Hacia la Antártida!¡Hacia la Antártida!

Ayer a las 4:00 pm habíamos salido de las oficinas del USAP, dirigiéndonos luego a cenar en uno de los restaurants de la ciudad. Me acosté a las 10:00 pm y me levanté muy alerta y descansado. Inmediatamente recogí el equipaje —que ya había dejado preparado desde la noche anterior— y pagué la cuenta del hotel. Nos recogió un autobús exactamente a las 6:00 am pues se nos había citado para las 6:30 am. Éramos ocho en el vehículo, incluyendo tres personas afiliadas al observatorio de neutrinos IceCube: James, Hans y yo.

5:56 am: Abordando el autobús hacia las oficinas de USAP en Christchurch, Nueva Zelandia.5:56 am: Abordando el autobús hacia las oficinas de USAP en Christchurch, Nueva Zelandia.

Apenas demoramos unos minutos en llegar a la oficina. Tomamos la ropa que se nos había entregado —la cual es diseñada especialmente para extremos de frío— y nos la pusimos. El programa require vestir estos abrigos para dirigirse, transitar o regresar de la Antártida. Es requisito, para entrar o salir del avión, llevar al menos las botas y el parka rojo con insignia del USAP, además de otros cuatro artículos clave. Había en las paredes unos afiches que indicaban todos estos requerimientos.

6:44 am: Abrigándome para el frío de la Antártida.6:44 am: Abrigándome para el frío de la Antártida.

A las 7:20 am acudimos a una conferencia para participantes y delegados del USAP sobre cómo viajar a la Antártida. Nuevamente, nos explicaron la logística del viaje así como las medidas de seguridad a mantener. Existen, por ejemplo, regulaciones ecológicas bastante estrictas. A las 8:00 am otro autobús nos condujo directamente hasta la pista desde donde volaría el avión. Abordamos la nave y despegamos exactamente a las 9:25 am. El viaje fue de exactamente ocho horas, tal como nos habían explicado.

8:25 am: ¡Abordando el vuelo hacia la Antártida!8:25 am: ¡Abordando el vuelo hacia la Antártida!

El avión era distinto, ya que está equipado con esquíes retráctiles en el tren de aterrizaje. Íbamos en el avión unas treinta y seis personas, de los cuales 32 eran pasajeros y 4 tripulantes. Algunos de los pasajeros eran adscritos al programa Antarctica New Zealand y se dirigían a la estación Scott que se encuentra en la isla de Ross, a sólo pasos de la estación McMurdo. Ya dentro del avión pudimos quitarnos los abrigos, siempre y cuando los mantuviéramos a mano para uso durante inmediatamente después del aterrizaje.

9:37 am: En camino hacia la Antártida!9:37 am: En camino hacia la Antártida!

Los aviones de carga como el nuestro no tienen ventanillas como los aviones comerciales. Eso sí, algunas veces puede haber uno o dos pares de cristales en cada lado del fuselaje, y me tocó la suerte de hallarme sentado junto a uno de ellos. Miré hacia afuera y como a medio camino empecé a ver hielo movedizo sobre el mar (aproximadamente a unos 60 grados sur de latitud). A unas tres cuartas partes del camino (a partir de los 70 grados sur de latitud) comencé a distinguir grandes bancos de hielo.

2:24 pm: Esto era lo que se veía por las ventanas del avión (latitud 64 grados sur)..2:24 pm: Esto era lo que se veía por las ventanas del avión (latitud 64 grados sur).

4:14 pm: Posteriormente, esta era la vista (latitud 73 grados sur).4:14 pm: Posteriormente, esta era la vista (latitud 73 grados sur).

A las 5:25 pm aterrizamos en la barrera de hielo de Ross, a una distancia aproximada de 12 kilómetros de la estación McMurdo. Se nos asignó la pista de Williams Field, una de tres que se utilizan actualmente. El aterrizaje de un avión con esquíes es diferente y más suave que el de un avión comercial. La aeronave se deslizó unos cuantos kilómetros por encima del hielo, rápidamente, pero de modo preciso y sin tropiezos, después que el tren de aterrizaje tocó hielo.

5:25 pm: Llegada a la pista de McMurdo, ubicada a 12 kilómetros de la estación.5:25 pm: Llegada a la pista de McMurdo, ubicada a 12 kilómetros de la estación.

La barrera de hielo de Ross es una gran plataforma de hielo que flota sobre el mar, aunque la región donde nos tocó aterrizar queda a sólo pasos de la isla de Ross. Esta isla, a su vez, se ubica muy próxima del continente en propiedad. Sin duda alguna, el aterrizaje sobre esta zona helada fue una experiencia interesante. Se veía hielo por todos lados, por lo cual la superficie parecía blanqueada. Además, estando el cielo parcialmente nublado, se veía también blancuzco. Me pareció una vista hermosa e impresionante, aunque para otros podría ser una escena abrumadora.

5:26 pm: Así se veían los alrededores de la pista (latitud casi 78 grados sur).5:26 pm: Así se veían los alrededores de la pista (latitud casi 78 grados sur).

Tan pronto salimos del avión vimos que ya otro autobús nos esperaba. Subimos una cuesta por un amplio y bien mantenido camino de tierra construido sobre gravilla negra de origen volcánico. El recorrido hacia la estación en propiedad tomó como una media hora, considerando que todos los vehículos de este lugar están sometidos a unos límites muy estrictos de velocidad. Nos detuvimos unos minutos a pasos de la estación Scott para dejar bajar el grupo de Nueva Zelandia, compuesto por unas ocho personas. A las seis en punto arribamos oficialmente a la estación McMurdo, donde fuimos recibidos y orientados durante media hora por el administrador.

6:11 pm: Llegada al edificio de administración en la estación McMurdo.6:11 pm: Llegada al edificio de administración en la estación McMurdo.

Hacia las 8:30 pm salí con Hans y otras dos personas para dar un paseo del área. Tomamos una buena cantidad de fotografías y en cuestión de nada el reloj llegó a marcar las once de la noche. Como el Sol está siempre afuera —en este lugar y para esta época del año— uno sencillamente no se da cuenta de lo tarde que puede hacerse. Llevaba puestas mis gafas oscuras, pues la Antártida está expuesta a la luz ultravioleta procedente del Sol y que entra por el hueco en la capa de ozono. Lo curioso del caso es que no recordaba jamás haber llevado gafas oscuras a estas horas tan altas de la noche.

11:11 pm: ¡Con gafas de sol a las once de la noche!11:11 pm: ¡Con gafas de sol a las once de la noche!

Comments

Add new comment

Sarah Bartholow's picture

Sarah Bartholow said:

Hi Armando! So excited to see you on the ice!
Armando Caussade's picture

Armando Caussade replied:

Hi Sarah! It is awesome here! Looking at the pictures you will give you an idea of my excitement. Antarctica is absolutely impressive.
Lymari Hernandez's picture

Lymari Hernandez said:

Hola mi querido Armando..Cuídate mucho y que disfrutes en grande tu expedición. ..Que sea de mucho aprendizaje y enriquecimiento. ..Que Dios te acompañe en cada paso. ..un abrazo fuerte..Bendiciones desde la distancia. .Perdona que escribí en español pero no se que le pasa al teclado este...no consigo escribir en inglés y me cambia las palabras. ..Hasta pronto. ...
Armando Caussade's picture

Armando Caussade replied:

Gracias y no te preocupes por el idioma. Me alegro muchísimo escucharte, como dices, desde la distancia. Cuando empieces clases el 13 de enero háblale a los estudiantes sobre este proyecto, y si puedes, muéstrale esta página y otras nuevas que se hayan publicado. Seguiremos informando.
Lymari Hernandez's picture

Lymari Hernandez said:

Armando, que alegría saber que nos podemos comunicar por aquí. ..cuenta con eso...se lo diré a los estudiantes tan pronto comiencen. ..Gretchen desea que puedas tomarte un video corto saludando a los estudiantes desde donde estás. ..todos están emocionados y ya estas en la página de Facebook de la escuela. ..todos te envían recuerdos...Éxito. ..
Armando Caussade's picture

Armando Caussade replied:

Sí, definitivamente eso está en planes. Todavía no he llegado al polo sur, sino que estoy en la estación McMurdo en la costa de la Antártida. Trataré de hacer el video hoy más tarde, aunque de cualquier modo trataríamos de hacer uno mejor tan pronto lleguemos al polo hoy mas tarde o mañana. Si necesitas mi correo-e, pídeselo a Gretchen. Gracias por incluirme en Facebook. ¡Seguiremos informando!
William (Willie) Freytes's picture

William (Willie... said:

Hi Kiddo: First of all: ¡ Feliz Año Nuevo y Feliz Día de Reyes !!! What a way to start 2015, Pal !! It is really exciting to read your narrative about the start of your New Scientific Adventure, certainly you are accumulating "material" for your "Grandchildren Night Storytelling". Go for it Armando !!!!
Armando Caussade's picture

Armando Caussade replied:

Hi William! I absolutely appreciate your greeting, and you browsing and reading my journals. You have always been there to support me and that is worth more than a fortune. And yes, my stay here in Antarctica has been, so far, my best experience ever. I will call you to have a good chat right after my return. I hope that everything is fine with you and wish you the best ever new year. Take care!