About

PolarTREC Learning Resources are a collection of scientific and educational materials compiled by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), and made available to anyone who is interested in teaching or learning more about the science of the Arctic and Antarctica.

Recent Resources

The Arctic Ocean Curriculum Unit was created by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States with funding from the North Pacific Research Board. This project aimed to update and revise existing Arctic Ocean-related lesson plans originally created by PolarTREC program teacher alumni. The format used lends itself to the changes in education - providing student-facing slide decks that allow

Lesson
Arctic
n/a
Middle School and Up
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The PolarTREC Field Experience

After two years of anticipation due to Covid-19 derailments, I spent 12 days in Utqiaġvik, Alaska as the education officer with the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) from March 28-April 7, 2022. This was the 2022 IABP Utqiaġvik Spring Deployment under the National Science Foundation Award ​​#1951762 Collaborative Research: Coordination, Data Management and Enhancement of the

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Arctic
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In the October of 2021 when no expeditions were deploying due to Covid, the PolarTREC team sent out a survey to the 2019 and 2020 cohorts to identify how best to support them in further outreach (2019) or while waiting for their expeditions to deploy (2020). From that survey, the SEI (Success, Experience and Inspiration) Roundtable was created. Live events

The PolarTREC Field Experience

From September 9 - October 20, 2021, I participated in the 2021 NABOS (Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System) expedition on the RV Akademik Tryoshnikov. The Chief Scientist was Igor Polyakov from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and the International Arctic Research Center (IARC), and my PolarTREC team consisted of Elena Sparrow, outreach coordinator and

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Arctic
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The PolarTREC Field Experience

The night before I left Alaska I stayed up chatting with some of the scientists in the Toolik dining hall talking about my return to “normal civilization”. We spoke about the little habits that you pick up while at the field station and aren’t sure you’re going to let go (wearing sunglasses 24/7) as well as

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Arctic
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