Good news! I have finally arrived at Amundsen-Scott research station in the South Pole!

Arrival at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
Arrival at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

We had thought we would have to stay in McMurdo at least until Monday (January 12), until Hans told us, yesterday around early evening, that we would leaving on Sunday morning, and that a special flight had been arranged for us. "Are you sure?" I asked him. "Absolutely!, he answered." "Who told you that?" "Someone who is knowledgeable and trustworthy." "But, I mean, is this person a reliable source of information?" "Oh yes, she is!"

7:25 am: About to Leave McMurdo Station.  Armando, James and Hans.
7:25 am: About to Leave McMurdo Station. Armando, James and Hans.

After so many postponements we were reluctant to take anything for granted. But we anyway got up early and headed to McMurdo's bus station today at 7:00 pm. And what a neat surprise to see a the United States Antarctic Program (USAP) bus already waiting there for us! We quickly got in and started our descent down the hill to the edge ice shelf. When we reached the base of the hill the driver strapped snow chains on the tires, and then started driving the bus over the frozen ocean. The 12-kilometer ride was completed in about half an hour.

7:27 am: Driving over the frozen ocean, just outside of McMurdo Station.
7:27 am: Driving over the frozen ocean, just outside of McMurdo Station.

7:59 am: About to board the airplane.
7:59 am: About to board the airplane.

We boarded our airplane—a DC-3—and at 8:15 am we took off. I counted fourteen people in total, 11 passengers and 3 crew. This model actually had decent windows that allowed comfortable viewing, so I knew we we in for a show. I had already been told that the view of the Transantarctic Mountains—which lie right in the middle of our route—is simply breathtaking, so I had my camera ready. It was cloudy when we left McMurdo (actually it was cloudy the whole time we stayed there, minus a period of about four to six hours on January 6). The airplane rose above the clouds, and for the first hour we were not able to discern anything below. We were flying right over the Ross Ice Shelf at that time.

8:00 am: Inside the airplane.
8:00 am: Inside the airplane.

About an hour and a half into the flight the sky became clear, the Sun came out, and we started seeing ice-covered mountains, with the occasional rock outcrop or barren dark soil projecting above the ice cap. Without a doubt, this view is the most impressive that I have ever got from an airplane window. This amazing scenery displayed only three basic colors: blue, white and black. But there is beauty in simplicity. And then the Sun, with an elevation of only 22° over the horizon, produced an array of long, elegant shades that meandered down along the mountain slopes.

10:43 am: The Transantarctic Mountains as we flew over latitude 84° south.  This area is known as the Queen Alexandra Range.
10:43 am: The Transantarctic Mountains as we flew over latitude 84° south. This area is known as the Queen Alexandra Range.

11:00 am: The Transantarctic Mountains as we flew over latitude 85° south.  This area is known as the Beardmore Glacier.
11:00 am: The Transantarctic Mountains as we flew over latitude 85° south. This area is known as the Beardmore Glacier.

When flying from Ross Island to the geographic South Pole the Transantarctic Mountains are encountered between latitudes 82° and 86° south. After another hour and a half, the mountains gradually steered away to the east and gave way to the Antarctic Plateau. It was interesting to watch the patterns that the ice had formed upon the flat surface by the action of the elements, something that has also been observed in other planets, such as Mars. The ice just took the strangest shapes ever.

At exactly 12:45 pm we landed safely at the runway just outside of Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Total flight time was four and a half hours. As I stepped out of the plane I saw the most beautiful scenery ever in Earth. The sky was deep blue and the ice pure white. I stared down at the ground and saw sparkle everywhere, caused by small grains of ice that shone with light reflected from the Sun. It looked like thousands of little diamonds strewn everywhere along the ice. A number of people from the station had assembled on the runway and greeted us as we stepped down. I was approached at once by Dr. Michael DuVernois of the Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC) and also by Elisa Pinat of Université Libre de Bruxelles.

12:53 pm: Arrival at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
12:53 pm: Arrival at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

The temperature was –29 °C (–20 °F), which is typical for the South Pole at this time of the year. Overall, very bearable and even comfortable if wearing the right clothing, such as the one provided by USAP. As I walked over to the station I remained mesmerized by the scenery. It is something that has to be seen in real life in order to be understood, and the pictures out there simply do not do it justice.

12:55 pm: Welcome sign at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
12:55 pm: Welcome sign at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

At the station lunch usually ends at 1:00 pm, but they kept serving food until all of us had eaten, well after 1:00 pm. I felt particularly grateful towards this gesture, as a hot meal is always a treat. From 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm we got a tour of the IceCube Laboratory, headed by Dr. DuVernois. We were taken to all areas of the building and given a complete explanation of how the detector works. Since the laboratory is located one kilometer away from the main station we drove there by snowmobile. I had never traveled in a snowmobile before, so I must say that it was quite an experience. In the next few days I will elaborate on the IceCube neutrino telescope and its importance for high-energy astronomy.

2:12 pm: Arrival to the IceCube Laboratory.
2:12 pm: Arrival to the IceCube Laboratory.

3:26 pm: Inside the IceCube laboratory.  Michael, Hans, James and Armando.
3:26 pm: Inside the IceCube laboratory. Michael, Hans, James and Armando.

¡Buenas noticias! Finalmente he llegado a la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur.

Llegada a la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur.
Llegada a la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur.

La realidad es que nos habíamos resignado a quedarmos en la estación McMurdo hasta por lo menos el lunes (12 de enero). Pero el sábado, temprano en la noche, se acercó Hans y dijo que nos iríamos el domingo por la mañana, y que habían preparado un vuelo especial para nosotros. Le pregunté, "¿Estás seguro?", a lo que él respondió "Claro que sí". "¿Pero quién te dijo eso?" "Me lo dijo alguien que conoce de estas cosas". "¿Y estás seguro que esa persona es confiable?" Totalmente".

7:25 am: Saliendo de la estación McMurdo.  Armando, James y Hans.
7:25 am: Saliendo de la estación McMurdo. Armando, James y Hans.

La verdad es que después de tantas posposiciones ya no dábamos nada por seguro. Pero de cualquier modo nos levantamos temprano y nos dirigimos a la parada de autobuses de la estación. Y cuál sería nuestra sorpresa cuando encontramos un autobús del Programa Antártico de los Estados Unidos (USAP) que nos esperaba. Inmediatamente entramos y comenzamos el descenso desde la loma hasta la plataforma de hielo. Al pie de la loma, el chofer se bajó e instaló cadenas en los neumáticos. Seguimos por encima del hielo y completamos el recorrido —de unos 12 kilómetros— en media hora.

7:27 am: Manejando sobre mar congelado, cerca de la estación McMurdo.
7:27 am: Manejando sobre mar congelado, cerca de la estación McMurdo.

7:59 am: Abordando el avión.
7:59 am: Abordando el avión.

A las 8:00 am abordamos el avión —un DC-3— y 15 minutos después levantamos vuelo. Había 14 personas en total: 11 pasajeros y 3 tripulantes. Afortunadamente esta aeronave disponía de múltiples ventanillas que permitían al pasajero darse gusto mirando a través de ellas. Pasaríamos directamente por encima de la Cordillera Transantártica, la cual había escuchado que representa una vista espectacular. Había estado nublado cuando salimos de la estación McMurdo (aunque en realidad lo estuvo todo el tiempo, salvo un breve período de cuatro o seis horas el 8 de enero). El avión se levantó sobre las nubes y no pudimos discernir nada en tierra durante la primera hora de vuelo. En ese momento nos desplazábamos sobre la barrera de hielo de Ross.

8:00 am: Dentro del avión.
8:00 am: Dentro del avión.

Llevábamos como una hora en el aire cuando se despejó. Salió el Sol y comenzamos a ver montañas completamente heladas, con la ocasional excepción de algún promontorio rocoso o terreno desnudo de color oscuro que se abría entre el hielo. Sin lugar a dudas, esta escena constituye lo más impresionante que jamás haya visto desde la ventanilla de un avión. Aunque el panorama mostraba sólo tres colores (azul, blanco y negro) a veces hay belleza en las cosas sencillas. También el Sol —que en ese momento alcanzaba sólo 22° sobre el horizonte— dibujaba unas sombras largas y llamativas que cubrían casi toda la bajada de las montañas.

10:43 am: Las Montañas Transantárticas cuando volábamos sobre los 84° de latitud sur.  A esta área se le conoce como la sierra de la reina.
10:43 am: Las Montañas Transantárticas cuando volábamos sobre los 84° de latitud sur. A esta área se le conoce como la sierra de la reina.

11:00 am: Las Montañas Transantárticas cuando volábamos sobre los 85° de latitud sur.  A esta área se le conoce como el glaciar de Beardmore.
11:00 am: Las Montañas Transantárticas cuando volábamos sobre los 85° de latitud sur. A esta área se le conoce como el glaciar de Beardmore.

En camino desde la isla de Ross hasta el polo sur geográfico las Montañas Transantárticas quedan en el medio, discurriendo entre los paralelos 82° y 86° de latitud sur. Transcurrió otra hora y media de vuelo, y las montañas comenzaron a apartarse gradualmente en dirección hacia el este. El avión se desplazaba ahora sobre el altiplano antártico. Resultó especialmente interesante ver las curiosas formas que había tomado el hielo en la superficie debido a las inclemencias del tiempo. Este fenómeno se ha observado también en otros planetas, particularmente en Marte.

Finalmente, a las 12:45 pm aterrizamos en la pista de hielo de la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur. El vuelo duró exactamente cuatro horas y media. Al bajar del avión contemplé la más hermosa escena que haya jamás visto en la Tierra. El cielo se mostraba de azul intenso, y el hielo con un blanco perfectamente puro. Miré al suelo y vi brillo por doquier, causado por el reflejo del Sol en los granos de hielo. Parecía como si miles de pequeños diamantes se hubieran desparramado sobre el hielo en todas direciones. Un grupo de personas se había concentrado para recibirnos según bajáramos del avión. Se me acercó inmediatamente el doctor Michael DuVernois, del Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC), seguido por Elisa Pinat, de la Université Libre de Bruxelles.

12:53 pm: Llegada a la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur.
12:53 pm: Llegada a la estación Amundsen-Scott en el polo sur.

La temperatura en el polo sur era exactamente –29 °C (–20 °F), lo cual es muy normal para esta época del año. Realmente son condiciones muy tolerables y hasta cómodas, siempre y cuando utilice uno la vestimenta adecuada, como la provista por el USAP. Mientras caminábamos hacia la estación quedé fascinado con el entorno. Ciertamente se trata de algo que no puede comprenderse mediante fotografías, y que hay que ver con los propios ojos para captarlo en todo su esplendor.

12:55 pm: Letrero de bienvenida en la estación Amundsen-Scott del polo sur.
12:55 pm: Letrero de bienvenida en la estación Amundsen-Scott del polo sur.

El horario de almuerzo en la estación termina a la 1:00 pm, sin embargo, a pesar de haber llegado nosotros unos minutos más tarde nos tenían la comida lista. Es un gesto que merece agradecimiento, pues una comida caliente siempre es un halago. Posteriormente —entre 2:30 pm y 4:30 pm— nos traslasdamos al laboratorio IceCube, amablemente dirigidos por el doctor DuVernois. Se nos mostró todas las secciones de la instalación e igualmente se nos ofreció una explicación completa del funcionamiento del aparato. Dado que el laboratorio dista un kilómetro de la estación propiamente dicha, nos trasladamos mediante motonieve. Fue una experiencia muy grata, pues nunca había viajado en un vehículo de este tipo.

Seguiremos estos posts, y en los próximos días hablaré más a profundidad sobre el telescopio de neutrinos IceCube y sus aportaciones a la astronomía de altas energías.

2:12 pm: Llegada al laboratorio IceCube.
2:12 pm: Llegada al laboratorio IceCube.

3:26 pm: Dentro del laboratorio IceCube.  Michael, Hans, James y Armando.
3:26 pm: Dentro del laboratorio IceCube. Michael, Hans, James y Armando.

Date
Weather Summary
Clear and sunny.
Temperature
–29 °C (–20 °F)
Wind Speed
0 km/hr (0 miles per hour)
Wind Chill
–29 °C (–20 °F)
Add Comment

Comments

Lymari Hernandez (not verified)

Armando! !! Finalmente estás en el Polo Sur...esas fotos expresan tanta emoción que hablan solas!!!.Me parece increíble. .ahora sí. .Felicidades a todos! !! Estamos muy orgullosos de que estas logrando tu meta..Disfruta mucho de la experiencia...Dios mío! !-20....vaya frío. ...Cuídate mucho y hasta pronto. ..

Gretchen Guzmán (not verified)

Armando POR FIN LLEGASTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Ahora a tomar muchas fotos y recuerda siempre a los nenes y maestros que estan bien pendientes de ti. FELICIDADES!!!!!!!!

Gerardo (not verified)

Por fin llegas. Que nítidas las fotos. Éxito te felicito. Todo va a salir super.

Gerardo (not verified)

Primo, unas medallas para celebrar, Lo que si seria super es un "check-in" en el Polo Sur!!!

Armando Caussade

Me alegra saber que están siguiendo los posts día a día. Por acá todo va de maravilla. Ya les contaré y les enseñaré más fotografías cuando regrese. ¡Hasta pronto!

Armando Caussade

¡Gracias, Gretchen! Sí, llegué, y todo lo que he visto es impresionante. Ya les contaré. Muéstrale a los estudiantes el video que filmé cerca de la estación McMurdo. Desde aquí sera muy difícil publicar nuevos videos debido al limitado ancho de banda, pero seguiré publicando texto y fotografías. ¡Hasta la próxima!

Armando Caussade

He llegado al lugar más impresionante del mundo. Lo que se ve con los propios ojos es aún superior a lo que muestran las fotografías. Ya nos reuniremos luego de mi regreso. ¡Y gracias por tu apoyo de siempre!