Today's commentary

Submitted by Ole (Greenland), Taylor (USA), Rebecca (Danish), and Tupaarnaq (Greenland)

Scientist Julia Bradley-Cook explains how to measure carbon dioxide in the soil
Scientist Julia Bradley-Cook explains how to measure carbon dioxide in the soil (Photo by Taylor Estabrooks, 2011)

Today we started our day with a lecture by ecologist Julia. She taught us about how carbon from the plant life and atmosphere were affecting the soil at different temperature levels.

Ice Sheet
Ice Sheet edge (Photo by Taylor Estabrooks, 2011)

We used a device called an Irga Gas Analyzer to check the carbon levels in different areas with different vegetation variations. Then the JSEP students split into teams to sample carbon levels of their own. Some groups sampled areas with shrubs and others without. First, we took our samples in a location close to town.

Aima measures soil moisture
Aima measures soil moisture. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Vince uses the IRGA to measure carbon flux near the ice sheet
Vince uses the IRGA to measure carbon flux near the ice sheet. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Then, we traveled to the edge of the icecap to compare the samples in two different climates. On our way to the icecap we saw this reindeer.

Caribou
Caribou (Photo by Taylor Estrabrooks)

Also on our way to the icecap, we observed a noticeable difference in temperature throughout the different climates we traveled through. When we arrived, some of us caught sight of an arctic hare.

Arctic Hare
Arctic hare by ice sheet edge at Point 660. (Photo by Hans Christian Sivertsen, 2011)

Team atmosphere collects their first data.
Team atmosphere collects their first data. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Team chemistry collects water samples at glacial lake.
Team chemistry collects water samples at glacial lake. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Team atmosphere collects data on the ice edge
Team atmosphere collects data on the ice edge. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Then on our way home we saw a herd of musk ox! It was the cherry on top of a very fun and educational day.

Today's Scientists

Julia Bradley-Cook (Dartmouth)

Scientist Julia Bradley-Cook has fun in the field.
Scientist Julia Bradley-Cook has fun in the field. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Courtney (Dartmouth)

Courtney documents science
Courtney documents science. Photo by Laura Lukes (2011)

Agenda Highlights

  1. Lecture on carbon cycling and climate by guest scientist, Julia Bradley-Cook

  2. Fieldtrip to site near Kangerlussuaq to test carbon flux using IRGA

  3. Fieldtrip to Point 660 (Ice sheet edge) to test carbon flux using IRGA

Vocabulary

IRGA- instrument that measures carbon flux gas in soil using infrared light

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