Greenland Education Tour 2011 Journals

Agenda Highlights 1) 6am flight! 2) Next steps...
JSEP
JSEP Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011 Baby musk ox on the way to Russell Glacier. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Russell Glacier and awesome metamorphic rocks! Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Ice melt structures. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Jakob, Kurt, and Ole by glacier. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Vince, Jeannie, Robbie, Kylie, and Paul wait for the next massive calving event! Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Arctic hare follows us! Photo by Kurt Olsen, 2011. Today's commentary Agenda Highlights 1) Last breakfast together 2) Hike to Russell Glacier with the NY Air National Guard (109th) 3) Last dinner together 4) Sharing photos
Taking bags to the Kangerlussuaq airport
Taking bags to the Kangerlussuaq airport. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Rebecca reluctantly says goodbye. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Saying goodbye to the Danish students. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Recycling pays in Greenland! Jeannie and Vince earn 150 Danish Kroner (about $50)! Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Recycling pays in Greenland! Jeannie and Vince earn 150 Danish Kroner (about $50)! Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Agenda Highlights 1) Our last breakfast together 2) Saying goodbye at the airport 3) Packing, cleaning, and finishing reports Vocabulary atoqqillugu (Greenlandic) - recycle/use again
Ole and Sylvia experience a pilot's view
Today's student commentary Submitted by Ole (Greenland) Today we started with a plane tour in airport and. In this plane tour we were told how the Hercules airplanes are and how solitary parts (engine, cockpit, emergency etc.) are. We could ask about everything we will know and could sit on the pilot seat which was pretty awesome! After sitting comfortably on the cockpit we drove to Air National Guard Office which is beside the airport. We went around in the office to see how it works. (Pilot) Paul Bernasconi told about the Air Guard system and said that the pilots go often to Raven which is an old base on the ice cap east to Kangerlussuaq. JSEP gets a tour of the LC-130. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Ole and Sylvia experience a pilot's view. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Jeannie and...
JSEP folks at NEEM
Today's student commentary Submitted by Avaruna Mathaessun (Greenland) Avaruna at NEEM, author of today's commentary (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) JSEP folks at NEEM (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Emil looking down the drill shaft as Hans Christian explains the drilling process and future of the site(Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Kurt holds up 150,000 year old ice from the bedrock. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. At the snow pit (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Sylvia drives us back to the main building (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Today's teacher commentary Submitted by Shelly Hynes (USA) Shelly Hynes, author of today's commentary (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Last day on the ice unfortunately! We headed to NEEM today, the North Greeland Eemian Ice Drilling site for a tour...
Jeannie Wilkening
Today's student commentary Submitted by Jeannie Wilkening (USA) Jeannie Wilkening, author of today's commentary (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Today started out as a pretty slow morning. While some of us got up in time to go to breakfast, others took advantage of the open schedule and slept in for a while. Later in the morning, we got together for our team meeting. We reviewed all the science and scientists we had seen at Summit. It was a great refresher since we saw so much even in the short time we were there. It is amazing how much goes on at Summit and how much logistical work goes into making that all possible. This review was also really helpful as we began working on our presentations this afternoon. We went to lunch and were supposed to go tour around one of the Air National...
Heading back to catch a flight to Kangerlussuaq
Today's student commentary Submitted by Christine Nohr Pedersen (Denmark) Christine Nohr Pedersen, author of today's commentary (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) Today we woke up at 7 am and in spite of the fact that the wind chill made the air feel like minus 22° C we were well protected in our polar gear. JSEP makes the webcam! (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) We had to pack our sleeping kit and stack our bags before 7.30 am so they were ready to be loaded on the plane. But the question we asked ourselves all morning was if the plane would be able to land and bring us back to Kangerlussuaq. It was a bit thrilling when we were told that the plane’s departure wasn’t confirmed as planned. Luckily the plane was only a little delayed but as we already have learned there are many difficulties...
Measuring snow density on the skiway
Today's teacher commentary Submitted by Jakob (Greenland) Home sweet home...tent city at Summit...where scientists sleep. Photo by Jakob Moller Bach, 2011 After a good night in the tent with minus 150C, we were ready for the day program. We started at 0730 with breakfast while the station manager told us about the activity on the station to day. After breakfast we talk to Brian about station life, and after that we went with Nate Miller to see and hear about his atmosphere project, were he looks at clouds and have it affect the temperature on ground (the ice sheet), snow crystal, snow temperature and snow structure. He shoved us this cool snow pit, were you can see the different snow layer! Robbie shows the layers of snow in the backlit snow pit. Photo by Jakob Moller Bach, 2011...
JSEP group arrives at Summit
JSEP group arrives at Summit (Photo by Jakob Moller Bach, 2011) Today's teacher commentary Submitted by Jakob (Greenland) Jakob Moller Bach - author of today's commentary (Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011) We are going to the Summit Station to day – YES We went from Kangerlussuaq to the Summit at 0700 with a C-130 from the US Air Force, it was really expedition. LC-130 waiting for take off from the world's longest ice skiway. Photo by Jakob Moller Bach The Summit field station was established in 1989 by the US NSF as Greenland ice sheet project 2 (GISP2) ice core drilling site – location the highest point on the ice sheet! We will stay here from the 17. -19. And then who knows? Since we have travelled from 20m above sea-level to a height of 3243m, we all fill a little high...
JP Steffensen explains ice cores and Earth's climate history
Today's student commentary Submitted by Kurt Olsen (Greenland) Today we were very excited to take off to NEEM, but still the plans were flexible, so the plan was to be ready to take off today or tomorrow. We went to the waterfall around the sugarloaf area, just a hike, but our primary goal was to photograph the musk ox, unfortunately we didn’t see a single musk ox. Hiking to waterfall. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. The waterfall. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. Ole and Sylvia with waterfall in the background. The water is much higher since the Geology Research Group's first visit to the waterfall last week. Photo by Laura Lukes, 2011. We went home after the waterfall hiking and waited for JP, the mastermind behind the ice core drillings in Arctic and Antarctica to hear his...