journal tabs

Journal
Michael Lampert's picture

Jens and I grab a bite to eat and we are off to Oslo.....It is about an eight hour flight, slightly delayed. Again, I am lucky to get a window seat with a great view of the Atlantic seaboard. I take a short nap and wake up flying over some beautiful snow covered mountains, below is my first glimpse of Norway. I am stunned at the amount of snow on the remnant of this ice cap. It is similar to my feeling when I looked out the window for the first time when flying over Antarctica... a link is added here to my journal that details the science of ozone research there.

http://tea.armadaproject.org/lampert/8.21.2003.html

An Antarctica GlacierThis photo was taken from a C17 flying over the continent of Antarctica, it was my first view of this ice covered place. The complete journal is at http://tea.armadaproject.org/lampert/8.21.2003.html

Ice cap near OsloThis is a view from the flight into Oslo showing a snow covered ice cap, very different than the continent of Antarctica.

A closer look through the camera lens shows the U-shaped glacier carved valleys below and what appears to be a glacier moraine with a small lake. A view of a glacier moraine from the airplane near OsloI think if you look carefully you can see a glacier moraine and U-shaped glacier carved valleys.

The entire landscape appears flattened and twisted; the snow seems to pile up in areas that highlight the desolated area artistically.

A view of the landscape near OsloThe landscape appears rough and artistic from the air.

My flight into Oslo is late so I must hang around the airport for a few hours which is great because I can catch some sleep. The airport is completely deck out in hardwood floors. The security seems not so interested in the fact that I am lugging about a fifty pound box with a satellite phone in it. I am pretty frustrated with the gigantic box, it actually got stuck in the Portland airport scanner and Homeland security had to crawl into the x-ray machine to unplug it. Hope they had the machine off. The flight to Bodo is just an hour or so... I am going north to the Arctic Circle. North of the latitude line of about 66 degrees lies the land we refer to as the Arctic, home of the bears. Beneath this line the sun still can set, above this line the sun will not dip below the horizon in the summer. When I was in Antarctica I lived below the equivalent Antarctica circle and watched the sun go round and round. The arrival into Bodo was simply and the folks here are very nice. They are mostly Caucasian blonde, fair skinned folks but there is a small mix of others too. It really isn't very cold at all so I drop my stuff off at the hotel and take a look around the small city.

A typical street in Bodo, NorwayNot a single tree is in bloom yet and the grass is all winter brown, leaving the city a dull color of grey.

Bodo is mostly a shipping portSailboats and other large ships line the harbor.

A distant houseAcross the harbor is this old looking house with a lighthouse.

Bodo HotelI am staying here till Friday on the fourth floor. The room is the size of a typical college dorm, there is a European breakfast of cheese, bread and ham each morning. The staff is great, I highly recommend this place.

A modern church located nearbyI am not sure of the details of this church, everything is in Norweigan, but beneath the spire is a memorial to WWII, there are many spots in the town that remind you of the war and its toll on the people here.

Jens has been with me all along and seems to know a few things. He introduces me to a fellow bear... a distant cousin named Arla... who we find at the pier near one of the many boats in this shipping port.

ArlaNear a ship just a block away from the hotel.

I meet up with Mark Mathisen at the hotel, his flight arrived just a few hours after mine. We find dinner at a great Norwegian Indian restaurant and talk about the project. Mark is a technician at Iowa State in the Geology department. He is in charge of the set up here, he is an incredibly resourceful an knowledgeable person, I can see why he was chosen. We talk about the seismic sensors he has brought along, some simple Arduino boards with a three way accelerometer on board that will be placed into the glacier, just as soon as we can get up there! Tomorrow we head out and shop for supplies in Bodo.