Climate Change Svalbard

What Are They Doing?

The team traveled to Svalbard, Norway, located in the High Arctic to investigate how high latitude glaciers, melt-water streams, and sedimentation in lakes and fjords respond to climate change. The Svalbard region has been marked by the retreat of glaciers, reductions in sea ice, and measurable warming throughout the Holocene period, and more specifically during the last 90 years. The Svalbard archipelago has preserved geologic records of climate change since the last ice age and into the 20th century, which makes it an ideal location for this study.

Where Are They?

The team worked on and around the glaciers and lakes of Kapp Linne near their field camp at Isfjord Radio on western Spitsbergen, the largest island in the Svalbard arctic archipelago. The Svalbard archipelago is situated in the Arctic Ocean, north of mainland Europe, approximately mid-way between Norway and the North Pole.

Expedition Map

Project Information

Dates: 17 July 2007 to 2 August 2007
Location: Svalbard, Norway
Project Funded Title: Climate Change in Glacier-River-Lake Ecosystems in Svalbard, Norway

Journals

Subscribe to %1 PolarTREC Journals

Meet the Team

Matt Moore's picture
Kents Hill School
Kents Hill, ME
United States

Matthew Moore teaches High School Biology, AP Environmental Science, Lake Ecology, Conservation Biology, and Field Biology at Kents Hill School in Kents, Maine. Mr. Moore is very interested in climate science, in particular how anthropogenic factors of climate change may be influencing arctic ecosystems and cultures. Mr. Moore was very happy to broaden his knowledge and skills by participating in this expedition in order to better teach young people about the Earth’s ecosystems and their role in it.

Mike Retelle's picture
Bates College
Lewiston, ME
United States

Dr. Mike Retelle is a Professor at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Dr. Retelle teaches courses that focus on Earth surface environments and records of environmental change.
Currently Dr. Retelle is involved in several research projects in high latitude areas of the North Atlantic region. He has worked in the Canadian Arctic since 1981 focusing on glacial and sea level history and records of climate change preserved in annually layered sediments in lakes. Dr. Retelle has been working in Svalbard since 2005 and has previously mentored numerous undergraduate students in the field through the National Science Foundation’s REU program (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) as well as several past PolarTREC teachers.

Steve Roof's picture
Hampshire College
Amherst, MA
United States

Dr. Steve Roof is an Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Science at Hampshire College. Professor Roof's teaching and research focus on environmental issues such as climate change, pollution, and land conservation. He consciously integrates the scientific, political, and social aspects of environmental problems in his classes and projects. He teaches and supervises projects in geology, climate change, resource conservation, land use planning, geographic information systems, environmental chemistry, and the evolution of scientific thought. He and his students travel frequently to Death Valley and the Southwest for climate change field research. He also coordinates the Svalbard REU program, taking undergraduate students to the High Arctic. To learn more about Dr. Roof, please visit his faculty biography page [http://www.hampshire.edu/faculty/sroof.htm]