What Are They Doing?

The team raises meteorological instrument equipment onto the Sabrina Automatic Weather Station (AWS), Antarctica.
The team raises meteorological instrument equipment onto the Sabrina Automatic Weather Station (AWS), Antarctica. Photo by David Mikolajczyk, Courtesy of Michael Penn.
The Antarctic Automatic Weather Station (AWS) network has been making meteorological observations since the early 1980s. This continent-wide network is positioned to observe significant meteorological events and increase our understanding of the climate of the Antarctic surface. Researchers utilize the AWS network to observe and learn about the Antarctic in a warming world. Given the duration of the AWS program and maintaining AWS sites for many years, numerous studies have been conducted on the surface climatology of regions of the continent, such as the Ross Ice Shelf. This climatology also aids in other studies, like winter warming events.

The Antarctic Automatic Weather Station network provides a greater understanding of the surface meteorology and climatology throughout the continent of Antarctica. The AWS network spans the Ross Ice Shelf, Ross Island, West Antarctica, East Antarctica, and the South Pole. Since some of the AWS have been working for over 30 years, we can begin to understand the climate over many regions of Antarctica.

Where Are They?

A view of McMurdo Station, Antarctica from halfway up Observation Hill.
A view of McMurdo Station, Antarctica from halfway up Observation Hill. Photo by Jennifer Bault.
Based at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, the team will travel to remote locations. These locations may include the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and South Pole Station.

Latest Journals

Joining PolarTREC feels like going from sitting on the couch yesterday to running a 5K today - in several ways! EXCITEMENT & ENGAGEMENT I have always been curious about the polar regions of the Earth and science in general, and I've always described myself as a life long learner. However, being…
Let's Get It Started! January 6, 2020. I head to mandatory professional development after a winter break filled with food, family, and the flu (type A). My colleagues smile in greeting and ask,"Well...???" They all want to know what's happened. Its been several weeks since my PolarTREC…
Dates
-
Location
McMurdo Station, Antarctica
Project Funded Title
Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program 2016-2019
Cassie Kautzer - Educator
Educator
Hellstern Middle School

Cassie Kautzer teaches 6th grade science and co-coaches 6th/7th grade competitive robotics at Hellstern Middle School in Springdale. AR. Cassie earned her Bachelor's Degree at the University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh in Middle Level Education and Mathematics. She has now been teaching for 12 years and is a National Board Certified Teacher. Cassie is also a 2014 Presidential Award of Excellence in Math and Science Teaching - Science Awardee. She has previously sailed with NOAA as a Teacher-at-Sea on the NOAA ship Rainier. Cassie loves engaging her students in hands-on science and inspiring them to set goals! She tries to lead and learn by example - engaging in authentic science professional development and striving to be a life-long learner!

Matthew Lazzara - Researcher
Researcher
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Matthew A. Lazzara is an Associate Scientist and Research Meteorologist at the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC), Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW–Madison). He is presently the Principal Investigator of the Antarctic Automatic Weather Station Program. Dr. Lazzara is also a faculty member and Department Chair in the Department of Physical Sciences, School of Arts and Sciences, at Madison Area Technical College. There he teaches courses on weather & climate and climate & climate change. He’s research work focuses on observing the Antarctic from the surface and from satellites to gain an understanding of how Antarctic weather and climate behaves. Dr. Lazzara has deployed to Antarctica 10 times in the last 23 years.

Lee Welhouse - Researcher
Researcher
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Lee Welhouse is an Instrument Technician at the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC), Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). He is a co-Principal Investigator of the Antarctic Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Program. His primary role is designing, building, and maintaining the AWS systems. His research work has been on El Nino and La Nina teleconnections on Antarctica. He has deployed to Antarctica 10 times over the past 11 years.

Antarctic Automatic Weather Stations 2020 Resources

There are currently no resources associated with this expedition.