26 October 2016 Flying Off the Map

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Aaron
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Amazing

I have to imagine you pinch yourself a lot on this trip! Did you hope to get to set foot on Antarctica when you applied? The trade-off of seeing so much of the continent versus being able to spend time on the ice would be interesting but looks like a lot of fun. The interaction with the classrooms has to be rewarding!

You mentioned the rotations of crew, does that mostly apply to just the flight crew? Are the scientists pretty much the same every flight?

Amazing

Great questions, Aaron! I would love someday to be able to walk and learn from the surface of Antarctica, but that isn't this trip. We get to see parts of the continent from the plane that hardly anyone ever gets to see, which is a great honor. The interaction with students (665 last week!) is hugely rewarding. We hear from some teachers how excited the students are, and it has real impact on the crew. The rotation of crew is daily for the flight crew (pilots, navigator, flight engineer) and some of the science teams trade off as well. A few fly every flight though, like the lead project scientist, Nathan Kurtz and the mission scientists John Sonntag. I have flown 4/5 of the available flights so far, and I hope to keep that up. As other duties present themselves, like visiting classrooms and giving talks, I do take a "down day" however. Lots to be done, and tons of fun all around! Maggie :)

Aaron Hayes
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Must say...

...after reading your blog, I'm warming up to the chance to do a project like yours. I applied for the 2017-18 season and initially thought I would be a little let down if I got a boat/plane project - always been a dream to get to all 7 continents. But from reading your blog, the amount of Antarctica you get to see plus the amount of interaction you have with classrooms really makes it clear that regardless of the project, there are so many neat aspects of each that I need to get my hopes in check. The classroom communication really got me excited as that's I think the neatest aspect of all these projects.

Different question: how much data do you get to interact with on the projects on the flight? As a math and stats teacher, I'm eager to see what modeling data I can get my hands on :)

Must say...

Hi Aaron, you make really good points about the project. I have loved, loved, loved this project and couldn't be disappointed in any aspect of it although I totally get it about being on the ice. That would be amazing too! So, to answer your question about data, the best thing to do is to go to the NSIDC (National Snow and Ice Data Center) website and look at what they have. All this data goes there. They can help you pull a data set and its all free and open to the public. Let me know what you come up with! Maggie

Aaron Hayes
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thanks for the

Thanks for the website - will definitely post what I come up with. Have some down time tomorrow at in-service so we'll see. :)

Mike Penn
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Geographic South Pole

Maggie, Thank you so much for mentioning how important math is in your research. I'm constantly looking for evidence like this to show my students how and where the math they are learning is being applied and this is absolute GOLD!
Thanks again!

Mistia Zuckerman
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Thank you!

These are great pictures! I really appreciate this recap of your trip. I can imagine how exciting it must be to fly over the South Pole!

Mistia Zuckerman
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Thank you!

These are great pictures! I really appreciate this recap of your trip. I can imagine how exciting it must be to fly over the South Pole!

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Journal Details

Location: South Pole
Coordinates:
Latitude: 90° 0' 0" S
Longitude: 70° 0' 0" W
Weather Summary: Clear
Temperature: -30* F

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