Well, I just wanted to share a few pictures with you. We have started doing our afternoon outings and things are getting really exciting. We visited the Arctic Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) main office -- where we had lunch -- and later on went to the University of Alaska's Museum of the North, here in Fairbanks. PolarTREC, of course, is managed by ARCUS.

Armando and Janet at the ARCUS main office.
Armando and Janet at the ARCUS main office.

ARCUS headquarters
ARCUS headquarters

Enjoying dinner at the Pump restaurant.
Enjoying dinner at the Pump restaurant.

Wanted to add that temperatures have been between –18 °C and –34 °C (–0 °F and –30 °F) for like the whole week. That is easily tolerable, of course with the right clothing. Here you can see us with the ice polar bear at the University of Alaska, and a couple of hours later walking on top of a frozen lake.

Temperature: –11 °C (–24 °F)
Temperature: –11 °C (–24 °F)

Armando and Lisa Seff walking over a frozen lake.
Armando and Lisa Seff walking over a frozen lake.

Lastly, I am posting a picture of one of our mentors, Michelle Brown, at the Amundsen-Scott research station in the South Pole. This is exactly the place where I am headed next December together with the IceCube NeutrinoAn elementary particle with zero charge and zero mass. An electrically neutral particle that is often emitted in the process of radioactive decay of nuclei. Neutrinos are difficult to detect, and their existence was postulated twenty years before the first one was actually discovered in the laboratory. Millions of neutrinos produced by nuclear reactions in the sun pass through your body every second without disturbing any atoms. ObservatoryA location used for observing terrestrial and/or celestial events. team, headed by Dr. James Madsen of the University of Wisconsin at River Falls.

Michelle Brown points to the Geographic South Pole. This is the Geographic South Pole as measured in January of 2011. Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica.  Photo by Andy Stillinger, Courtesy of Michelle Brown (PolarTREC 2011/2012), Courtesy of ARCUS
Michelle Brown points to the Geographic South Pole. This is the Geographic South Pole as measured in January of 2011. Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. Photo by Andy Stillinger, Courtesy of Michelle Brown (PolarTREC 2011/2012), Courtesy of ARCUS

Finalmente les pongo algunas fotografías. Hemos comenzado nuestras salidas diarias cada tarde, lo cual ha resultado fabuloso. En primer lugar visitamos el Consorcio de Investigación Ártica de los Estados Unidos (ARCUS, por sus siglas en inglés), organización encargada de la administración del programa PolarTREC. Posteriormente pasamos al Museo del Norte, ubicado dentro del campus de la Universidad de Alaska, en Fairbanks.

Armando y Janet
Armando y Janet en las oficinas de ARCUS

Oficinas de ARCUS
Oficinas de ARCUS

Disfrutando la cena
Disfrutando la cena en el restaurante

Las temperaturas se han mantenido entre –18 °C y –34 °C (–0 °F y –30 °F) consistentemente a lo largo de la semana. La verdad es que bien vestido y con la ropa adecuada, no se siente frío.

Temperatura: –24 °C (–11 °F)
Temperatura: –24 °C (–11 °F)

Armando y Lisa
Armando y Lisa Seff caminando sobre aguas congeladas

Antes de retirarme les dejo con una fotografía de una anterior participante (y ahora mentora) de PolarTREC. Se trata de Michelle Brown, quien visitó la estación Amundsen-Scott en el Polo Sur, lugar a donde viajaré este próximo diciembre. El viaje lo haré con el equipo dirigido por el doctor James Madsen de la Universidad de Wisconsin, para utilizar el telescopio IceCube.

Michelle Brown en el Polo Sur
Michelle Brown señalando el Polo Sur geográfico. Se trata del Polo Sur geográfico en su ubicación para enero de 2011, cerca de la estación Amundsen–Scott en la Antártida. Fotografía por Andy Stillinger, Cortesía de Michelle Brown (PolarTREC 2011/2012), Cortesía de ARCUS

Date
Location
Fairbanks, Alaska
Weather Summary
Partly cloudy.
Temperature
–24 °C (–11 °F)
Wind Speed
Calm
Wind Chill
–24 °C (–11 °F)

Comments

Sarah Bartholow

Hi Armando, Does it feel very cold in Fairbanks? Do you think it will feel the same at south pole?

Guest

Hola Primo, estupendas fotos. Cuando tengas detalles de los trabajos nos los dejas saber.
Saludos y exito.

Gerardo.

Armando Caussade

Gracias, primo. Me alegra saber que has disfrutado las fotos, y agradezco el apoyo. Es muy grato recibir tus saludos aquí en Alaska, y
saber que estás leyendo los diarios. Sí, luego publicaré detalles sobre
los trabajos. ¡Seguiremos!

Armando Caussade

Not really, the temperature it is pretty comfortable provided you have the right clothing. And yes, the South Pole averages around -28 C (-18 F) in January, which is pretty similar to what we have been experiencing here this week in Fairbanks. Of course, the wind chill factor is to be taken account of at the South Pole, but I do not think it will be that different.

Guest

I imagine you have a new perspective on "cold" weather. Gorgeous scenery, thanks for sharing. Have fun!!!

Gretchen

Guest

I imagine you have a new perspective on "cold" weather. Gorgeous scenery, thanks for sharing. Have fun!!!

Gretchen

Guest

holaaaaa misterrr es de la escuelaa Pedro Rivera Molinaaa

Armando Caussade

Yes, you do get a perspective! And the scenery is absolutely impressive. You do have to see it in person, as the pictures simply do not do it justice. Thanks for posting, Gretchen!

Guest

My name its Elizabeth and saw your link in one of your cousin Eunice's wall post. Wishing you the safest, most informative and full adventure and wonder, on your honor and trip, the South pole. I lived in Colorodo, by the Glendwood Springs Canyon where I went to college, and to me the weather, in small increments and the right clothing, its toleable as you said. And the views and fresh air... Makes it all worth it. Continued blessings to you and yours. www. travelinghugs. com

Guest

My name its Elizabeth and saw your link in one of your cousin Eunice's wall post. Wishing you the safest, most informative and full adventure and wonder, on your honor and trip, the South pole. I lived in Colorodo, by the Glendwood Springs Canyon where I went to college, and to me the weather, in small increments and the right clothing, its toleable as you said. And the views and fresh air... Makes it all worth it. Continued blessings to you and yours. www. travelinghugs. com