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August 7, 2010 Glacier research.

Ducks have recently hatched and have been seen in the lake, in the ocean and karst ponds following their parents and learning their duck skills.

Ducks
The baby ducklings have hatched and can now be seen around the lakes and ocean.

Braided outwash channel.
Braided outwash channel into Lake Linne.


The glacier group is winding down their sample collection.  They go to the glacier every other day and have one more sample collection day before we leave our field site.  They have a very long walk of 26 kilometers (16 miles) each day to get to the glacier and back.  They carry down 24 -1/2 liter samples from the glacier (53 lbs) of water collected in the ISCO automatic water samplers.  Terra is characterizing the amount of particles covering the snow and took over 100 pictures today on the glacier.  Going to the glacier is not an easy job.  They are usually so late getting back to Isfjord Radio that we delay our dinner from 8 pm until 9 pm to make sure they are back in time.  They also have very hearty appetites after their long field day.


The current status of the glacier:  almost all the snow is gone and it is now down to the ice.  Soot is on the snow; some of it seems to be recent and some is from previous accumulation.

Glacier research.
The highs and lows of Arctic glacier research. Part 1. the highs!

The highs and lows of Arctic glacier research. Part 2. the lows!


Wes and Jordan have been doing mapping projects on the talus slopes.  For safety reasons, Wes wears a stylish hard hat.
Wes researching talus slopes.
Wes researching rock talus slopes and avalanches.


 

Wes in the field
Wes's research includes rock glacier and glacier avalanche studies.

Photos

Ducks
Braided outwash channel.
Glacier research.
Wes researching talus slopes.
Wes in the field

Details

Cheryl Forster's picture
Author: Cheryl Forster
Expedition: High Arctic Change 2010